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In the first two decades of the 21st century, the relationship between viewers and television underwent major changes, with the advent of technologies that led to new viewing habits. This situation starts now to question the ability of broadcasters to build and retain loyal viewers. As a response, broadcasters are adapting their contents and distribution to fit in the new digital world. While studying the possible impacts of the efforts made by broadcasters, we complete our analysis by addressing also the factors that guide consumer choices through media use models, which focus on the psychological, emotional, personal and environmental aspects of media consumption choices. Through interviews with Moroccan broadcasters, this paper aims to identify which behavioral aspects and innovation levers broadcasters should take into account to build audience loyalty in the era of digital media.

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